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Older Half-Brother of N. Korean Leader Killed by Agents with Poison Needle in Malaysia
The Late Kim Jong-Nam

Kim Jong-Nam, older half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, was assassinated by the two female spies with poison needle in Malaysia on Feb. 13 (Monday), 2017, South Korea's TV Chosun reported on the following day.

The TV and other local South Korean news media quoted multiple South Korean government sources in reporting the assassination of the oldest grandson of North Korean founder Kim Il-Sung.

Protected by the Chinese government, the late 46-year-old Kim Jong-Nam had long been a threat to the throne of the current leader Kim Jong-Un, according to the experts.

The assassination took place at the Kuala Lumpur Airport at around 9 a.m. on Feb. 13 (Monday), 2017.

Local South Korean news media said that Kim Jong-Nam was found fallen in the shopping area of the ariport immediately he was attacked by the two female agents with poison needle.

Police in Malaysia confirmed on Feb. 14 (Tuesday), 2017 that a North Korean man died en route to hospital from Kuala Lumpur airport a day earlier.

Abdul Aziz Ali, police chief for the Sepang district, said that the man was identified as "Kim Jong-Nam," older half-brother of North Korea's current leader Kim Jong-Un.

The two North Korean agents fled the scene in a taxi immediately after the assassination. The North Korean operatives still remain at large while Malaysia police seeking the whereabouts of them.

In May of 2001, the late Kim Jong Nam was caught at Tokyo's Narita Airport while he was trying to enter Japan to go to Disneyland with his son and two unidentified women in the Japanese capital.

He was travelling on a fake passport at the time before he was evicted out of Japan.

Since then Kim had been staying in China, visiting Macau from time to time for gambling.

In recent years Kim had been known to travel between Singapore and Malaysia visiting his lover.

The late Kim Jong-Nam was threatened his life several times in the past. he survived an assassination attempt in Bejing, China after his father Kim Jong-Il died in 2011.

Kim Jong-Nam was Kim Jong-Il's oldest son and the current North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un is Kim's third son. They had different mothers, who all passed away.

Experts pointed out that the current leader Kim Jong-Un assassinated his older brother to bolster his position as the North Korea's absolute ruler.

The late Kim had always been a threat to his rule because Chinese government supported and protected the older Kim.

Political analysts said that there are still many North Korean people supporting the older brother as the rightful leader.

They argued that Chinese leadership considered the older brother as the alternative leader of North Korea in case the current North Korean regime crumbles.

Well aware about the above fact, the current leader thought that his older brother posed a serious threat to his rule of North Korea.

When their father died in 2011 the older Kim was not able to attend the funeral fearful of his younger brother, the current leader.

The current leader Kim Jong-Un had his own uncle Jang Sung-taek arrested and killed for a treason charge in 2013.

Jang was the supporter of the older brother. Jang was the husband of Kim Kyung-Hee, younger sister of the current leader's father Kim Jong-Il who had four wives.




 

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